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Today, 2nd June, 2014, is Dragon Boat Festival.

The Dragon Boat or Duanwu 端午 Festival is a traditional holiday originating in China.

The festival now occurs on the 5th day of the 5th month of the Lunar calendar. The focus of the celebrations involves eating zongzi 粽子 (rice dumplings, sticky rice treats wrapped in bamboo leaves) and racing dragon boats.


The story best known in modern China holds that the festival commemorates the death of the poet and minister Qu Yuan 屈原 (c. 340–278 BC) of the ancient state of Chu 楚 during the Warring States period of the Zhou 周 Dynasty. However, when the king decided to ally with the increasingly powerful state of Qin 秦,Qu was banished for opposing the alliance. During his exile, Qu Yuan wrote a great deal of poetry. Twenty-eight years later, Qin captured the Chu capital. In despair, Qu Yuan committed suicide by drowning himself in the Miluo River 汨罗江.

It is said that the local people, who admired him, raced out in their boats to retrieve his body. This is said to have been the origin of dragon boat races. When his body could not be found, they dropped balls of sticky rice into the river so that the fish would eat them instead of Qu Yuan’s body. This is said to be the origin of zongzi.

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Today, 2nd June, 2014, is Dragon Boat Festival. The Dragon Boat or Duanwu 端午 Festival is a traditional holiday originating in China. The festival now occurs on the 5th day of the 5th month of the Lunar calendar. The focus of the celebrations involves eating zongzi 粽子 (rice dumplings, sticky rice treats wrapped in bamboo leaves) and racing dragon boats. The story best known in modern China holds that the festival commemorates the death of the poet and minister Qu Yuan 屈原 (c. 340–278 BC) of the ancient state of Chu 楚 during the Warring States period of the Zhou 周 Dynasty. However, when the king decided to ally with the increasingly powerful state of Qin 秦,Qu was banished for opposing the alliance. During his exile, Qu Yuan wrote a great deal of poetry. Twenty-eight years later, Qin captured the Chu capital. In despair, Qu Yuan committed suicide by drowning himself in the Miluo River 汨罗江. It is said that the local people, who admired him, raced out in their boats to retrieve his body. This is said to have been the origin of dragon boat races. When his body could not be found, they dropped balls of sticky rice into the river so that the fish would eat them instead of Qu Yuan’s body. This is said to be the origin of zongzi.
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Today, 2nd June, 2014, is Dragon Boat Festival.

The Dragon Boat or Duanwu 端午 Festival is a traditional holiday originating in China.

The festival now occurs on the 5th day of the 5th month of the Lunar calendar. The focus of the celebrations involves eating zongzi 粽子 (rice dumplings, sticky rice treats wrapped in bamboo leaves) and racing dragon boats.


The story best known in modern China holds that the festival commemorates the death of the poet and minister Qu Yuan 屈原 (c. 340–278 BC) of the ancient state of Chu 楚 during the Warring States period of the Zhou 周 Dynasty. However, when the king decided to ally with the increasingly powerful state of Qin 秦,Qu was banished for opposing the alliance. During his exile, Qu Yuan wrote a great deal of poetry. Twenty-eight years later, Qin captured the Chu capital. In despair, Qu Yuan committed suicide by drowning himself in the Miluo River 汨罗江.

It is said that the local people, who admired him, raced out in their boats to retrieve his body. This is said to have been the origin of dragon boat races. When his body could not be found, they dropped balls of sticky rice into the river so that the fish would eat them instead of Qu Yuan’s body. This is said to be the origin of zongzi.

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Today, 2nd June, 2014, is Dragon Boat Festival. The Dragon Boat or Duanwu 端午 Festival is a traditional holiday originating in China. The festival now occurs on the 5th day of the 5th month of the Lunar calendar. The focus of the celebrations involves eating zongzi 粽子 (rice dumplings, sticky rice treats wrapped in bamboo leaves) and racing dragon boats. The story best known in modern China holds that the festival commemorates the death of the poet and minister Qu Yuan 屈原 (c. 340–278 BC) of the ancient state of Chu 楚 during the Warring States period of the Zhou 周 Dynasty. However, when the king decided to ally with the increasingly powerful state of Qin 秦,Qu was banished for opposing the alliance. During his exile, Qu Yuan wrote a great deal of poetry. Twenty-eight years later, Qin captured the Chu capital. In despair, Qu Yuan committed suicide by drowning himself in the Miluo River 汨罗江. It is said that the local people, who admired him, raced out in their boats to retrieve his body. This is said to have been the origin of dragon boat races. When his body could not be found, they dropped balls of sticky rice into the river so that the fish would eat them instead of Qu Yuan’s body. This is said to be the origin of zongzi.
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Chinese New Year Cake, 年糕,or nian gao, is a common food during Chinese New Year season. This is a must have dish as its name carries the same pronunciation of higher year by year  年高,or nian gao.

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Chinese New Year Cake, 年糕,or nian gao, is a common food during Chinese New Year season. This is a must have dish as its name carries the same pronunciation of higher year by year 年高,or nian gao.
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    A BASIN dish or pun choi, 盆菜,is a traditional Hakka cuisine, with layers of different kinds of food, including meat, seafood, and vegetables, stacked up and served in a huge basin-like pan. This dish is a popular festival dish favored by Chinese people staying in Guangdong, Hong Kong and some Southeast Asian countries.

  The common ingredients include chicken, duck, fish, pork, oyster, dried bean curd, radishes and mushrooms. Secret sauces are made by cooks to be added to the dishes. Rich juices are blended after the last procedure — stewing. Usually the juiciest dishes are put at the bottom. Expensive food, including shark’s fins, abalones, and shrimps can also be added to the traditional home-style dish.

    There is a story about the origin of basin dishes. About 700 years ago, the national p
hero Wen Tianxiang, a general of the Song Dynasty, who fled to a beach at what is now Shenzhen. The fishermen prepared preserved pork and radishes, as well as fish and shrimps for him and his soldiers. As no bowls or plates were available, a wooden basin was used to hold all the food.

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A BASIN dish or pun choi, 盆菜,is a traditional Hakka cuisine, with layers of different kinds of food, including meat, seafood, and vegetables, stacked up and served in a huge basin-like pan. This dish is a popular festival dish favored by Chinese people staying in Guangdong, Hong Kong and some Southeast Asian countries. The common ingredients include chicken, duck, fish, pork, oyster, dried bean curd, radishes and mushrooms. Secret sauces are made by cooks to be added to the dishes. Rich juices are blended after the last procedure — stewing. Usually the juiciest dishes are put at the bottom. Expensive food, including shark’s fins, abalones, and shrimps can also be added to the traditional home-style dish. There is a story about the origin of basin dishes. About 700 years ago, the national p hero Wen Tianxiang, a general of the Song Dynasty, who fled to a beach at what is now Shenzhen. The fishermen prepared preserved pork and radishes, as well as fish and shrimps for him and his soldiers. As no bowls or plates were available, a wooden basin was used to hold all the food.
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金桔,or kumquat, is an evergreen short tree, producing edible golden-yellow fruit. This plant symbolizes good luck and wealth in Chinese culture as the word 桔 shares a similar pronunciation with the word, 吉 (luck and auspicious). In Hong Kong and overseas Chinese community, people like to hang some red packets on kumquat tree as they believe it will being weather to the house. 招财进宝,or inviting the wealth and treasures into the house, are written in traditional characters. It is a very common decoration during Chinese New Year.

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金桔,or kumquat, is an evergreen short tree, producing edible golden-yellow fruit. This plant symbolizes good luck and wealth in Chinese culture as the word 桔 shares a similar pronunciation with the word, 吉 (luck and auspicious). In Hong Kong and overseas Chinese community, people like to hang some red packets on kumquat tree as they believe it will being weather to the house. 招财进宝,or inviting the wealth and treasures into the house, are written in traditional characters. It is a very common decoration during Chinese New Year.
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Wishing everyone a happy Chinese New Year and a prosperous year ahead!

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Wishing everyone a happy Chinese New Year and a prosperous year ahead!
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银柳, cat-tail willow is one of the favorite Chinese New Year decorative plants in Singapore, Malaysian and Taiwan as it’s name, 银柳(yin liu), shares the same pronunciation with the word ‘silver currency’ (银两)in a local dialect. The cotton like blossoms are always dyed to different colors to add in festival atmosphere. The green plant next to it is called lucky bamboo in Chinese, 富贵竹. Chinese people like to arrange the bamboo in different tiers and watch the green bamboo leaves growing day by day. They favorite this decorative plant as they hope to bring luck to their family in the new year.

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银柳, cat-tail willow is one of the favorite Chinese New Year decorative plants in Singapore, Malaysian and Taiwan as it’s name, 银柳(yin liu), shares the same pronunciation with the word ‘silver currency’ (银两)in a local dialect. The cotton like blossoms are always dyed to different colors to add in festival atmosphere. The green plant next to it is called lucky bamboo in Chinese, 富贵竹. Chinese people like to arrange the bamboo in different tiers and watch the green bamboo leaves growing day by day. They favorite this decorative plant as they hope to bring luck to their family in the new year.
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Today is the 8th day of the 12th lunar month, which is called La Month (腊月) in Chinese. This special day is often known as Laba festival (腊八节) , which is viewed as the traditional start of celebrations for the Chinese New Year.

On this day a special hot rice porridge, called Laba Zhou (腊八粥) is eaten, which contains various ingredients such as glutinous rice, black rice, red beans, green beans, kidney beans, dried dates, peanuts, dried lotus seeds and etc. On the previous night, people will begin the preparation and stew the porridge at about midnight. The flavor varies from place to place, in the North, it is a dessert with sugar added; in the South, salt and seasonal vegetables are put in.

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Today is the 8th day of the 12th lunar month, which is called La Month (腊月) in Chinese. This special day is often known as Laba festival (腊八节) , which is viewed as the traditional start of celebrations for the Chinese New Year. On this day a special hot rice porridge, called Laba Zhou (腊八粥) is eaten, which contains various ingredients such as glutinous rice, black rice, red beans, green beans, kidney beans, dried dates, peanuts, dried lotus seeds and etc. On the previous night, people will begin the preparation and stew the porridge at about midnight. The flavor varies from place to place, in the North, it is a dessert with sugar added; in the South, salt and seasonal vegetables are put in.
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A birthday card for my dearest mum! 


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A birthday card for my dearest mum!

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